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Earn Personal Trainer Certification through Oakland University PACE program

This summer, Oakland University’s Professional and Continuing Education (PACE) is partnering with World Instructor Training Schools (W.I.T.S.) to offer a Personal Trainer Certificate Program

“The health and fitness industry is booming, and this growth is expected to continue,” said Amy Olind, assistant director of PACE. “As a result, there are a variety of employment opportunities available for personal trainers holding a legitimate certification, and we are proud to provide the opportunity to achieve this at OU.”

Through the Personal Trainer Certificate Program, students will complete coursework that will prepare them to obtain Certified Personal Trainer – Level 1 status. Individuals with this certification help to improve overall health and fitness of clients ranging in age, health and fitness status through the development and implementation of fitness programs required for practice in the service industry in the United States.

“This program is ideal for those who are passionate about fitness and who are also looking to either change careers or earn some extra money doing what they love,” Olind said.

The cost of the course is $700 for current OU Recreation Center members (students and community), and $800 for non-members. It includes 15 hours of lecture and 15 hours of practical, hands-on training led by Erin Davidson, M.S., OU’s fitness programs and services coordinator, at OU’s on-campus recreation center (a four-month membership to the Rec Center is included in program tuition).

Additionally, included in the program cost is the opportunity for students to complete a comprehensive internship at a local fitness facility.

“W.I.T.S. is a fully accredited organization that provides a rigorous, up-to-date curriculum, and the course includes an extensive hands-on component,” Olind said. “This really caused them to stand out from their competitors, as we felt this experiential learning was a necessary piece of the training required to enter this field.”

After completing the 30-hour program, candidates receive a voucher to register with W.I.T.S. to take the written and practical examinations required to become a CPT – Level 1, and completion of the internship component allows for receipt of CPT – Level 2 status.

According to Olind, the courses will be offered twice a year, with the initial offering beginning in summer 2018 on Mondays and Wednesdays starting July 23 through Aug. 22 from 5:30-8:30 p.m.

“This program is open to community members and Oakland students alike, and we look forward to helping health and fitness enthusiasts from a variety of backgrounds reach their goals,” Olind said.

To receive updates about registration, sign up on the CPT Course Pre-Registration website. To learn more about the program, visit oakland.edu/pace/health-sciences/personal-trainer or contact PACE at oupace@oakland.edu.

Doctor teams with Beaumont, GVSU: Invents lifesaving cough-assist

Excerpt

The act of coughing may seem annoying, but for those who can no longer cough on their own because of a medical condition, it's a matter of life and death. Today, more people are surviving brain/spinal cord injuries caused by stroke and automobile accidents. Many of these individuals are unable to cough on their own, leaving them susceptible to infection and a collapsed lung.

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Oakland University, Baker College partner for physical therapy workshop

With a focus on promoting a community-based approach to health education, students and leaders in the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program at Oakland University and the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program at Baker College of Auburn Hills came together in OU’s Human Health Building to talk with individuals who have neurological impairments. 
 
The intra-professional workshop marked the first such collaboration between the two schools, according to Visiting Instructor of Physical Therapy, Jacqueline Scully, who helped coordinate the event for Oakland, along with Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, Deb Doherty.
 
“Healthcare is so much of a team effort now, whereas 25 years ago, we kind of worked in our own little silos,” Scully said. “We have to start getting students used to working with each other now so they’ll be ready for that when they get into the workforce.”
 
She added that the experience can also dispel misconceptions students may have about what it’s like to work with patients who have neurological impairments.
 
“I think it helps just being able to sit down with the patients, as well as their caretakers, and get a better understanding of who they are and what they’re going through.”

The patients at the intra-professional workshop had all suffered strokes and are all participants in OU’s Bridge the Gap Program. This community initiative pairs second- and third-year physical therapy students with patients in need of physical therapy to help treat neurological impairments. Students perform the physical therapy – under supervision of a licensed physical therapist – as part of their neurological interventions classes.
 
Emily Pietraniec, a Doctor of Physical Therapy student who has participated in Bridge the Gap, said that intra-professional collaboration between DPT and PTA students is a natural fit.
 
“We’ve had inter-professional education with medical and nursing students before, but never anything with PTA students. And they’re actually the ones we’ll be working with the closest,” she said. “It opens up good communication and allows both sides to show what they can offer.”
 
DPT student Ben McCown noted that while he worked with licensed PTA’s during one of his clinical internships, this was his first interaction with PTA students.
 
“This was a great opportunity to bring two parts of the profession together,” he said. “We’re going to be graduating pretty close together and working with some of the same patients toward the same goals. For us, it’s really about learning how to work together to achieve the best outcome for the patients.”

At the intra-professional event, students listened to patients and their spouses discuss their experiences dealing with the life-altering effects of neurological impairment – from time spent in hospitals and rehabilitation centers, to daily challenges of life at home and in the community.
 
Clarkston residents Philip and Carrolann Paradise were among those who shared their story with students. In 2013, Philip suffered a stroke that left him unable to walk. He spent time in both inpatient and outpatient facilities before connecting with Bridge the Gap, which he and his wife learned about from another participant in the program.

“It’s a wonderful program,” said Carrolann. “I wish all the colleges had it, but they don’t.”
 
She said her husband has benefited from the therapy, both physically and emotionally. He especially enjoys watching students learn from the experience.
 
“Of all the places we’ve gone to, we find that the students really have a heart for him,” she said. “One of the major issues right now is that there aren’t enough neuro PT’s. And by coming here, we get a chance to encourage people to go into neuro, so that we can get better services for Phil and other neuro patients.”

According to a 2017 Huffington Post article, more than 100 million Americans - close to a third of the total population - suffer from neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis, migraines, epilepsy and spinal cord injury. These conditions put a financial strain on the health care system, to the tune of nearly $800 billion in annual costs. Not all those costs are covered by insurance – which was one of many topics discussed at the intra-professional workshop.
 
“We talked about how insurance will only cover certain treatments and how that can be hard to deal with,” said PTA student Lauren Vanderhoff. “There’s also the daily activities of getting out of bed and getting around in the community. You have to really prepare and have a plan of what you’re going to do and how you’re going to get there.”

PTA student Kameron Joostberns said that hearing from patients and caregivers also gave him insight into the challenges they face.

“Something that most people wouldn’t think twice about, such as travel or vacation accommodations, is so noticeable to them,” he said. “It really does affect not just the patient, but the whole family.”
 
Vanderhoff added, “It’s important to recognize that the caregivers are going through this process with the patients, and they may be experiencing their own physical or emotional issues. So, going to support groups is not only for the patients, it’s for the caregivers too.”

Baker’s Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education, Susan Tomica, said the event gave the PTA students an opportunity to build on textbook and classroom instruction.
 
“These students are in their first semester of our PTA program, so they’re learning about concepts right now,” she said. “To be able to come here and see someone with real impairments share their experience is very valuable for them.”

Oakland University to recognize prestigious nurses at 30th Annual Nightingale Awards

Oakland University’s School of Nursing and its Board of Visitors are celebrating 30 years of honoring Michigan’s top nurses at its annual Nightingale Awards for Nursing Excellence.®
 
The only event of its kind in the state, this prestigious awards ceremony will be held on May 10, 2018 at the San Marino Club in Troy. The awards were created to spotlight nurses from a variety of clinical roles who go above and beyond in their care for their patients and their families. 
 
More than 700 nurses, physicians and administrators, as well as family members and nursing supporters will attend this year’s awards ceremony. This esteemed event includes an elegant sit down dinner and fish-bowl style raffle. Raffle winners have the opportunity go home with a 40” Smart TV, golf and spa certificates, a trip to Chicago and other unique packages. Fox 2 News anchors Roop Raj and Amy Andrews will once again co-emcee this year’s awards ceremony.
 
Each of ten winning recipients receives a check for $1,000, a solid bronze statue of Florence Nightingale and a special Nightingale ceremonial pin. Runners-up each receive a commemorative plaque and Nightingale ceremonial pin. Nominees were nominated by their peers, supervisors, friends and patients in recognition for their superior service and expertise.
 
The 2018 Nightingale Awards for Nursing Excellence® is presented by Beaumont Health.  Other sponsors include: Ascension Health, St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Detroit Medical Center, St. John Providence Medical Staff, Nexteer Automotive, McLaren Oakland & McLaren Macomb and PSJ Anesthesia. 
 
For more information, or for tickets to the event, please contact August Gunderson in the School of Nursing at (248) 364-8725, via email at nightingale@oakalnd.edu or visit oakland.edu/nursing/nightingale.

2018 Award Winners
 
Advanced Nurse Practice & Research
Winner: Mary Jo Smith, St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor
Runner Up: Makenzie Thimm, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence

Distinguished Alumni
Winner: Kristen R. McGrath, Beaumont Health – Royal Oak
Runner Up: Katie Hoxie, Beaumont Health – Royal Oak

Excellence in Education
Winner: Kino Xandro Anuddin, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence 
Runner Up: Antionette A. Trevino, Beaumont Health

Emerging Nurse Leader 
Winner: Michele Rausch, St. Joseph Mercy Oakland 
Runner Up: Faith Aven Straton, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence

Executive Administration
Winner: Marilyn S. Begle, Beaumont Home Health Services
Runner Up: Kathy M. Brubaker, St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea
 
Nursing in the Community
Winner: Diane Zalecki Bertalan, HAVEN of Oakland County
Runner Up: Mary Ann Ryan, HOPE Recuperative Care Center
 
Post-Acute Care & Specialty Nursing
Winner: Pamela Laszewski, Karmanos Cancer Center
Runner Up: Marla Clausen, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital
 
Staff Nurse (2)
Winner:  Sabrina M. Zott, St. Joseph Mercy Oakland 
Winner:  Deborah White, McLaren Oakland 
Runner-Up:  Maria Borri, Beaumont Health – Royal Oak 
Runner-Up:  Lisa M. Hill, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence 
 
People’s Choice Award
Winner:  Leesa J. Jones, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence
Runner-Up:  Krystal L. McNamee, Henry Ford Health System – Detroit

Trainee first responders learn to save lives through mobility


This feature is courtesy of Driven, the story of how the Detroit region is leading the world in next-generation mobility.

When first responders are on their way to an emergency, nothing is more important than information, because data learned in advance can save time and lives.

Critical information can tell first reponders if the the road ahead is clear, the size of the building on fire, if people are inside, and what kind of fire suppression system exists in the building.

With smart infrastructure enabling the new world of smart mobility, EMTs could have access to this information, and much more. They’ll also need to be trained to use new tools to gather this potentially life-saving data. That's why a number of companies, including Lear Corp., have helped install an array of new sensor technology into the Combined Regional Emergency Services Training (CREST) mini-city at Oakland Community College.

In addition to Lear’s roadside unit (RSU) sensors, HAAS Alert provided consumer alert applications, Mobile Data Holdings provided real-time video, and TracksUS provided in-vehicle diagnostics.

Running the show is Elaina Farnsworth, thought leader in the autonomous and intelligent transportation industry, and Mobile Comply CEO, says the sensors should be in place by this spring, allowing first responder trainees to test them in a real-world environment. Some of the connections will run through traffic lights, and some radios will be equipped with DSRC (dedicated short-range communication) devices to see if the safety messaging channel can be more effective.

"It really allows us to be very clear and targeted around new technologies that could aid and help these emergency responders in a controlled environment," Farnsworth says.

Mobile Comply was founded in 2010 to provide education and certification work for professionals who wanted to get into connected technology. She says the CREST project is the perfect next step in both educating the next generation of first responders and testing the sensors.

"We started talking about how nice it would be if we could have a conglomerate of different companies that would contribute something to be able to start training our emergency responders how to use some of these connected vehicle technologies," she says. "How can it make their jobs easier? How can it make saving lives faster?

Eventually, she hopes to incorporate drone technology, too, into the array of sensors getting real-time data from the scene of an emergency.

Douglas Smith, executive director for workforce development at Oakland Community College, says Lear has placed the sensors in the buildings and testing will wait until the weather clears up in the springtime. From there, they'll develop training modules for emergency workers.

12-year-old Michigan girl gets candy product into Walmart

Excerpt

Alina Morse, the 12-year-old founder of Zolli Candy, The After You Eat Treat, announced that she has expanded her 250k Smiles Program to 1 Million Smiles as her line expanded into 4,000 plus Walmart stores. A resident of Wolverine Lake, Michigan, Morse made the announcement on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) live on CNN, Feb. 27.

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Beaumont Health tests Michigan's first 3D whole breast ultrasound for cancer detection

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Beaumont Hospital in Dearborn is one of eight centers nationwide participating in research to improve the detection of breast cancer in women by using SoftVue three-dimensional ultrasound technology on women with dense breast tissue.

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Tech248 member MatchRX revolutionizing surplus prescription drug industry

Excerpt

Check out this cool Tech248 member company MatchRX a private web-based inter-pharmacy marketplace to buy and sell small quantities of non-controlled, non-expired overstocked prescription drugs and drugs in short supply to satisfy a specific patient need or declared public health emergency.

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5Qs with founder and executive director of Fleece and Thank You

Excerpt: 

DBusiness Daily News interviewed Nicholas Kristock, founder and executive director of Fleece and Thank You of Novi, about the nonprofit’s mission to create a more hopeful hospital environment by providing fleece blankets tagged with video messages to children battling an illness. Kristock played semi-professional soccer in Australia while working for four charities and considers the sport the “vehicle” that brought him to the nonprofit world. 

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Beaumont Health named 'Most Wired' by American Hospital Association

Beaumont Health has been named among the nation’s Most Wired Advanced hospitals according to results of the 19th Annual Health Care’s Most Wired survey, released today by the American Hospital Association’s Health Forum.

“The Most Wired hospitals are using every available technology option to create more ways to reach their patients in order to provide access to care,” said AHA President and CEO Rick Pollack. “They are transforming care delivery, investing in new delivery models in order to improve quality, provide access and control costs.”

According to the survey, Most Wired hospitals use smartphones, telehealth and remote monitoring to create more ways for patients to access health care services and capture health information. This year’s results show:
  • 76 percent offer secure messaging with clinicians on mobile devices.
  • When patients need ongoing monitoring at home, 74 percent use secure emails for patients and families to keep in touch with the care team.
  • 68 percent simplify prescription renewals by letting patients make requests on mobile devices.
  • 62 percent add data reported by patients to the electronic health record to get a better picture of what is going on with the patient.
  • Nearly half of the hospitals are using telehealth to provide behavioral health services to more patients.
  • 40 percent offer virtual physician visits.
  • More than 40 percent provide real-time care management services to patients at home for diabetes and congestive heart failure.
“At Beaumont Health, information technology helps our clinicians and patients make informed decisions about health care,” said Subra Sripada, executive vice president, chief transformation officer and chief information officer. “We use technology to engage the communities we serve and improve their experience. Receiving this award again reaffirms our team’s accomplishments and demonstrates Beaumont’s commitment to leveraging technology to advance the delivery of care in order to produce better outcomes for our patients.”

Innovation in patient care embraces emerging technologies and underscores the need for secure patient information exchange. Hospitals have increased their use of sophisticated IT monitoring systems to detect patient privacy breaches, monitor for malicious activities or policy violations and produce real-time analysis of security alerts.
  • 97 percent use intrusion detection systems.
  • 96 percent perform data access audits.
  • Nearly 90 percent run targeted phishing exercises to teach employees to question suspicious emails.
Most Wired hospitals are transforming care delivery with knowledge gained from data and analytics. They are investing in analytics to support new delivery models and effective decision-making and training clinicians on how to use analytics to improve quality, provide access and control costs.
  • 82 percent analyze retrospective clinical and administrative data to identify areas for improving quality and reducing the cost of care.
  • Three-quarters use sophisticated analytics such as predictive modeling and data to improve decision-making.
  • Nearly 70 percent interface electronic health record data with population health tools for care management.
  • More than 70 percent are providing data analytic tools training to physicians and nurses.
  • 45 percent initiate a patient pathway using health IT to follow a care plan.
  • Nearly 40 percent deliver quality metrics to physicians at the point-of-care.
  • 32 percent have tools for real-time patient identification and tracking for value-based care conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
HealthCare’s Most Wired survey, conducted between Jan. 15 and March 15, 2017, is published annually by Health & Hospitals Networks. The 2017 Most Wired survey and benchmarking study is a leading industry barometer measuring information technology use and adoption among hospitals nationwide.

The survey of 698 participants, representing an estimated 2,158 hospitals — more than 39 percent of all hospitals in the U.S. — examines how organizations are leveraging IT to improve performance for value-based health care in the areas of infrastructure, business and administrative management; quality and safety; and clinical integration.

Detailed results of the survey and study can be found in the July issue of H&HN. For a full list of winners, visit www.hhnmag.com.

About Beaumont Health
Beaumont Health is Michigan’s largest health care system, based on inpatient admissions and net patient revenue. A not-for-profit organization, it was formed in 2014 by Beaumont Health System, Botsford Health Care and Oakwood Healthcare to provide patients with the benefit of greater access to extraordinary, compassionate care, no matter where they live in Southeast Michigan. Beaumont Health has total net revenue of $4.4 billion and consists of eight hospitals with 3,429 beds, 174 outpatient sites, nearly 5,000 physicians and 36,000 employees and 3,500 volunteers.  In 2016, Beaumont Health had 177,508 inpatient discharges, 17,536 births and 567,658 emergency visits. For more information, visit beaumont.org.

About the American Hospital Association
The AHA is a not-for-profit association of health care provider organizations and individuals that are committed to the improvement of health in their communities. The AHA is the national advocate for its members, which include nearly 5,000 hospitals, health care systems, networks and other providers of care. Founded in 1898, the AHA provides education for health care leaders and is a source of information on health care issues and trends. For more information, visit www.aha.org.
 

Special needs adults earn praise and a paycheck at Mi Abilities

Excerpt

Bear Hall is on a mission to find meaningful work for young adults with disabilities. 

“What started this three years ago was I heard a statistic that in Huron Valley, from ages 25-54, there had been 1,200 kids on IEPs (individualized education program) and only 8 percent of them got a job. Ninety-six out of 1,200. And I said something has to change and it can’t just be jobs pushing carts and bagging.

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Henry Ford to offer innovative cancer screenings for dense breasts

Excerpt: 

In a first for Michigan, the Henry Ford Cancer Institute is introducing a new and advanced molecular breast imaging system to screen women with dense breast tissue, who are at an increased risk for breast cancer.

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Baker College of Auburn Hills respiratory care program achieves national "distinguished" credential

The respiratory care program at Baker College’s Auburn Hills campus has, for the third consecutive year, been recognized with the Distinguished RRT Credentialing Success Award from the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC).

Programs receiving the recognition are considered using objective criteria from the 2016 Annual Report of Current Status. The criteria includes three or more years of outcomes data; a documented student RRT credentialing success of 90 percent or greater; holding accreditation without a progress report; and meeting or exceeding CoARC thresholds for CRT credentialing success and positive job placement.

“Receiving this credential again underscores that our program is achieving its goals as well as our students,” said Peter W. Karsten, Ph.D., CPA, Baker College of Auburn Hills president. “Each time a Baker College respiratory care student achieves his or her goals, there is a health care employer that has hired an exceptional employee.”

Credentials for a registered respiratory therapist (RRT) and/or a certified respiratory therapist (CRT) are used as the basis for licensure in the 49 states that regulate the practice of respiratory care.

Respiratory therapists work primarily in health care facilities caring for patients who have trouble breathing, such as from a chronic respiratory disease like asthma or emphysema. Patients range from premature infants with undeveloped lungs to elderly patients with lung disease. Respiratory therapists also provide emergency care to patients suffering from heart attacks, drowning or shock.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of respiratory therapists is projected to grow 12 percent from 2014 to 2024, which is faster than average for all occupations. The median annual wage for respiratory therapists was $58,670 in May 2016. Baker College’s Auburn Hills campus launched its respiratory care associate degree program in 2006.

For more information about Baker College programs, contact Nicole Chirco in the admissions office at nicole.chirco@baker.edu or 248.340.0600, or visit www.baker.edu.

The largest private college in Michigan, Baker College is a not-for-profit higher education institution accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Founded in 1911, Baker College grants doctoral, master’s, bachelor’s and associate degrees, as well as certificates in diverse academic fields including applied technology, business, education, engineering, health science, information technology and social science. Baker College has on-ground campuses throughout Michigan and offers online programs that can be completed 100 percent online without ever visiting a campus. In 2016, the Online Learning Consortium recognized Baker College Online with the OLC Quality Scorecard Exemplary Endorsement, the highest ranking for online higher education programs. For information, visit www.baker.edu or follow Baker College on Twitter, @bakercollege, or on Facebook, www.facebook.com/bakercollege.
 

Judson Center's Autism Connections has begun a movement with over 30 official partners

During the month of April, Judson Center will be honoring National Autism Awareness month as we Bring Autism to Light for World Autism Day (officially on April 2). Judson Center’s main campus in Royal Oak (13 Mile and Greenfield Road), will be lit up blue beginning on Friday, March 31, and will continue to the end of the month. 
 
A movement has begun – Judson Center is teaming up with the City of Royal Oak to help Bring Autism to Light. During the next City Commissioners meeting, this Monday, March 27, Royal Oak Mayor, Michael Fournier along with the City Commissioners, will present an autism proclamation honoring National Autism Awareness Month and the life changing programs at Judson Center’s Autism Connections. Royal Oak is also urging all employees, residents and members of the business community to join the movement.
 
Many other partners, including the Royal Oak School DistrictTroy School Districtthe Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor (where Judson Center’s second Autism Connections program is located), Signs by Tomorrow, Medical Network One Health Solutions, Shrine Catholic Schools, Epsilon, Brooks Kushman, as well as over 20 other community businesses and organizations are joining the movement. 
 
Judson Center’s Royal Oak office is offering free blue light bulbs and lawn signs to anyone interested. You may also pick up lawn signs and light bulbs from Royal Oak City Hall as well as all three Royal Oak Fire Departments.  Companies can also participate and Bring Autism to Light by shining blue for autism, designating a day to wear blue for autism awareness, and making a donation to Judson Center’s Autism Connections.
 
“It is an honor to have the support of the community we serve.  At Judson Center’s Autism Connections, we understand that a diagnoses affects the entire family, not just a child and that is why this campaign is so important. To let our community know that you are not alone, Judson Center is here to help and support our community and families”, shared Judson Center CEO & President, Lenora Hardy-Foster.
 
Autism awareness is a part of Judson Center each day, as its Autism Connections program has been a part of Metro Detroit for over ten years, and expanded into Washtenaw County soon after, both providing comprehensive services to the entire family.  Currently, one in 68 children are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in Michigan, there are over 50,000 individuals living with ASD. 

Oakland University professor examines evolution of infectious disease with NIH grant

Excerpt

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Fabia Battistuzzi, Ph.D., an assistant professor of Biological Sciences at Oakland University, a $417,286 grant that will allow her to examine the evolution of infectious diseases while laying the groundwork for the development of new drug-based treatments that could help to save thousands of lives. 

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