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Health + Wellness : Innovation & Job News

91 Health + Wellness Articles | Page: | Show All

Bloomfield Hills-based Sterilogy and Grand Valley students develop system to help reduce infections

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Keeping hands clean and sanitized in hospitals and other medical facilities can be a challenging and inconvenient problem, with caregivers having to go to a sink or sanitizer station between each patient.

Bloomfield Hills-based Sterilogy worked with a group of Grand Valley State University applied Medical Device Institute (aMDI) students to devise a series of devices to address that issue. 

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Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak first in state to offer minimally invasive pediatric epilepsy surgery

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Beaumont Children’s Hospital in Royal Oak announced it was the first in Michigan to establish a Pediatric Stereo-Electroencephalography (SEEG) Epilepsy Surgery Program.

SEEG is a minimally invasive diagnostic EEG within the skull that pinpoints the source of seizures. It replaces a craniotomy with 2-millimeter holes in the skull, much smaller than the hole necessary for a craniotomy.

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Dentists all smiles over merger

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Scott Meldrum, D.D.S., was looking to slow down.

Glen Maylath, D.D.S., wasn’t actively looking to merge his practice with someone else.

But in June, the long-time friends and colleagues combined their dental practices creating Total Dental Fitness, and so far, it’s working beautifully.

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Troy's Laser Eye Institute the first in Michigan to perform SMILE with astigmatism surgery

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Michigan’s first SMILE with astigmatism laser corrective eye surgery was scheduled at the Laser Eye Institute in Troy. 

Zeiss, a global manufacturer of optical systems and creators of the Laser Eye Institute’s technology, announced on Oct. 5 that SMILE with astigmatism was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The company also announced the successful completion of 1.5 million procedures globally.

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Beaumont, Royal Oak earns prestigious nursing redesignation for the 4th consecutive time

Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak has once again achieved the highest honor for nursing excellence through the Magnet recognition program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center, a subsidiary of the American Nurses Association. Only about 8 percent of the hospitals across the country have earned Magnet status.

“Achieving Magnet status is a tremendous accomplishment in its own right. To sustain that level of excellence through four consecutive redesignation periods validates the hard work of the entire team at Royal Oak and a commitment to quality and safety that is second to none,” Susan Grant, RN, Beaumont Health executive vice president and chief nursing officer, said.

Magnet was created in 1994 to recognize health care organizations for quality patient care, nursing excellence and innovations in professional nursing practice. In 2004, Beaumont, Royal Oak became the first hospital in Michigan to achieve the milestone.
Next month, the redesignation will be presented to Beaumont staff at the 2018 ANCC National Magnet Conference in Denver, Colorado.

“It’s an honor to receive this Magnet redesignation. Our entire team is thrilled,” said Maureen Bowman, RN, Beaumont, Royal Oak’s chief nursing officer. “We empower our nurses and admire the way they serve our patients and families every day.”

Hospital President Rosanna Morris echoed Bowman’s sentiment. “We are proud of our nurses and the entire team at Beaumont, Royal Oak. It is a complete team effort to receive this redesignation,” Morris said.
During a recent visit to the hospital, surveyors reported:
  • Beaumont, Royal Oak demonstrated strong leadership throughout the hospital.
  • The surveyors said nurse-driven efforts to improve patient care, throughout the hospital, is extraordinary.
  • Beaumont, Royal Oak promotes a non-punitive environment to improve safety and outcomes for patients.
  • Beaumont, Royal Oak’s overall elder care environment, including the way the team cares for and connects with geriatric patients, is exemplary. They were impressed with innovative initiatives, including the ACE Unit/Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders program and the virtual dementia tour, which provides first-hand experience to families and patients about what it is like to have dementia.
Beaumont Hospital, Troy earned Magnet recognition in 2009. Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe achieved Magnet status in March.

Main Street Eye Care: Neighborhood optometry for every family member

Excerpt

In the newly remodeled Royal Oak office on Main Street between 11 Mile and 12 Mile Roads that he shares with Dr. David Chorney, Ray Salerno of Main Street Eye Care talks about his practice and his recent move to Royal Oak from his previous location in Bingham Farms.

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Earn Personal Trainer Certification through Oakland University PACE program

This summer, Oakland University’s Professional and Continuing Education (PACE) is partnering with World Instructor Training Schools (W.I.T.S.) to offer a Personal Trainer Certificate Program

“The health and fitness industry is booming, and this growth is expected to continue,” said Amy Olind, assistant director of PACE. “As a result, there are a variety of employment opportunities available for personal trainers holding a legitimate certification, and we are proud to provide the opportunity to achieve this at OU.”

Through the Personal Trainer Certificate Program, students will complete coursework that will prepare them to obtain Certified Personal Trainer – Level 1 status. Individuals with this certification help to improve overall health and fitness of clients ranging in age, health and fitness status through the development and implementation of fitness programs required for practice in the service industry in the United States.

“This program is ideal for those who are passionate about fitness and who are also looking to either change careers or earn some extra money doing what they love,” Olind said.

The cost of the course is $700 for current OU Recreation Center members (students and community), and $800 for non-members. It includes 15 hours of lecture and 15 hours of practical, hands-on training led by Erin Davidson, M.S., OU’s fitness programs and services coordinator, at OU’s on-campus recreation center (a four-month membership to the Rec Center is included in program tuition).

Additionally, included in the program cost is the opportunity for students to complete a comprehensive internship at a local fitness facility.

“W.I.T.S. is a fully accredited organization that provides a rigorous, up-to-date curriculum, and the course includes an extensive hands-on component,” Olind said. “This really caused them to stand out from their competitors, as we felt this experiential learning was a necessary piece of the training required to enter this field.”

After completing the 30-hour program, candidates receive a voucher to register with W.I.T.S. to take the written and practical examinations required to become a CPT – Level 1, and completion of the internship component allows for receipt of CPT – Level 2 status.

According to Olind, the courses will be offered twice a year, with the initial offering beginning in summer 2018 on Mondays and Wednesdays starting July 23 through Aug. 22 from 5:30-8:30 p.m.

“This program is open to community members and Oakland students alike, and we look forward to helping health and fitness enthusiasts from a variety of backgrounds reach their goals,” Olind said.

To receive updates about registration, sign up on the CPT Course Pre-Registration website. To learn more about the program, visit oakland.edu/pace/health-sciences/personal-trainer or contact PACE at oupace@oakland.edu.

Doctor teams with Beaumont, GVSU: Invents lifesaving cough-assist

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The act of coughing may seem annoying, but for those who can no longer cough on their own because of a medical condition, it's a matter of life and death. Today, more people are surviving brain/spinal cord injuries caused by stroke and automobile accidents. Many of these individuals are unable to cough on their own, leaving them susceptible to infection and a collapsed lung.

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Oakland University, Baker College partner for physical therapy workshop

With a focus on promoting a community-based approach to health education, students and leaders in the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program at Oakland University and the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program at Baker College of Auburn Hills came together in OU’s Human Health Building to talk with individuals who have neurological impairments. 
 
The intra-professional workshop marked the first such collaboration between the two schools, according to Visiting Instructor of Physical Therapy, Jacqueline Scully, who helped coordinate the event for Oakland, along with Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, Deb Doherty.
 
“Healthcare is so much of a team effort now, whereas 25 years ago, we kind of worked in our own little silos,” Scully said. “We have to start getting students used to working with each other now so they’ll be ready for that when they get into the workforce.”
 
She added that the experience can also dispel misconceptions students may have about what it’s like to work with patients who have neurological impairments.
 
“I think it helps just being able to sit down with the patients, as well as their caretakers, and get a better understanding of who they are and what they’re going through.”

The patients at the intra-professional workshop had all suffered strokes and are all participants in OU’s Bridge the Gap Program. This community initiative pairs second- and third-year physical therapy students with patients in need of physical therapy to help treat neurological impairments. Students perform the physical therapy – under supervision of a licensed physical therapist – as part of their neurological interventions classes.
 
Emily Pietraniec, a Doctor of Physical Therapy student who has participated in Bridge the Gap, said that intra-professional collaboration between DPT and PTA students is a natural fit.
 
“We’ve had inter-professional education with medical and nursing students before, but never anything with PTA students. And they’re actually the ones we’ll be working with the closest,” she said. “It opens up good communication and allows both sides to show what they can offer.”
 
DPT student Ben McCown noted that while he worked with licensed PTA’s during one of his clinical internships, this was his first interaction with PTA students.
 
“This was a great opportunity to bring two parts of the profession together,” he said. “We’re going to be graduating pretty close together and working with some of the same patients toward the same goals. For us, it’s really about learning how to work together to achieve the best outcome for the patients.”

At the intra-professional event, students listened to patients and their spouses discuss their experiences dealing with the life-altering effects of neurological impairment – from time spent in hospitals and rehabilitation centers, to daily challenges of life at home and in the community.
 
Clarkston residents Philip and Carrolann Paradise were among those who shared their story with students. In 2013, Philip suffered a stroke that left him unable to walk. He spent time in both inpatient and outpatient facilities before connecting with Bridge the Gap, which he and his wife learned about from another participant in the program.

“It’s a wonderful program,” said Carrolann. “I wish all the colleges had it, but they don’t.”
 
She said her husband has benefited from the therapy, both physically and emotionally. He especially enjoys watching students learn from the experience.
 
“Of all the places we’ve gone to, we find that the students really have a heart for him,” she said. “One of the major issues right now is that there aren’t enough neuro PT’s. And by coming here, we get a chance to encourage people to go into neuro, so that we can get better services for Phil and other neuro patients.”

According to a 2017 Huffington Post article, more than 100 million Americans - close to a third of the total population - suffer from neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis, migraines, epilepsy and spinal cord injury. These conditions put a financial strain on the health care system, to the tune of nearly $800 billion in annual costs. Not all those costs are covered by insurance – which was one of many topics discussed at the intra-professional workshop.
 
“We talked about how insurance will only cover certain treatments and how that can be hard to deal with,” said PTA student Lauren Vanderhoff. “There’s also the daily activities of getting out of bed and getting around in the community. You have to really prepare and have a plan of what you’re going to do and how you’re going to get there.”

PTA student Kameron Joostberns said that hearing from patients and caregivers also gave him insight into the challenges they face.

“Something that most people wouldn’t think twice about, such as travel or vacation accommodations, is so noticeable to them,” he said. “It really does affect not just the patient, but the whole family.”
 
Vanderhoff added, “It’s important to recognize that the caregivers are going through this process with the patients, and they may be experiencing their own physical or emotional issues. So, going to support groups is not only for the patients, it’s for the caregivers too.”

Baker’s Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education, Susan Tomica, said the event gave the PTA students an opportunity to build on textbook and classroom instruction.
 
“These students are in their first semester of our PTA program, so they’re learning about concepts right now,” she said. “To be able to come here and see someone with real impairments share their experience is very valuable for them.”

Oakland University to recognize prestigious nurses at 30th Annual Nightingale Awards

Oakland University’s School of Nursing and its Board of Visitors are celebrating 30 years of honoring Michigan’s top nurses at its annual Nightingale Awards for Nursing Excellence.®
 
The only event of its kind in the state, this prestigious awards ceremony will be held on May 10, 2018 at the San Marino Club in Troy. The awards were created to spotlight nurses from a variety of clinical roles who go above and beyond in their care for their patients and their families. 
 
More than 700 nurses, physicians and administrators, as well as family members and nursing supporters will attend this year’s awards ceremony. This esteemed event includes an elegant sit down dinner and fish-bowl style raffle. Raffle winners have the opportunity go home with a 40” Smart TV, golf and spa certificates, a trip to Chicago and other unique packages. Fox 2 News anchors Roop Raj and Amy Andrews will once again co-emcee this year’s awards ceremony.
 
Each of ten winning recipients receives a check for $1,000, a solid bronze statue of Florence Nightingale and a special Nightingale ceremonial pin. Runners-up each receive a commemorative plaque and Nightingale ceremonial pin. Nominees were nominated by their peers, supervisors, friends and patients in recognition for their superior service and expertise.
 
The 2018 Nightingale Awards for Nursing Excellence® is presented by Beaumont Health.  Other sponsors include: Ascension Health, St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Detroit Medical Center, St. John Providence Medical Staff, Nexteer Automotive, McLaren Oakland & McLaren Macomb and PSJ Anesthesia. 
 
For more information, or for tickets to the event, please contact August Gunderson in the School of Nursing at (248) 364-8725, via email at nightingale@oakalnd.edu or visit oakland.edu/nursing/nightingale.

2018 Award Winners
 
Advanced Nurse Practice & Research
Winner: Mary Jo Smith, St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor
Runner Up: Makenzie Thimm, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence

Distinguished Alumni
Winner: Kristen R. McGrath, Beaumont Health – Royal Oak
Runner Up: Katie Hoxie, Beaumont Health – Royal Oak

Excellence in Education
Winner: Kino Xandro Anuddin, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence 
Runner Up: Antionette A. Trevino, Beaumont Health

Emerging Nurse Leader 
Winner: Michele Rausch, St. Joseph Mercy Oakland 
Runner Up: Faith Aven Straton, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence

Executive Administration
Winner: Marilyn S. Begle, Beaumont Home Health Services
Runner Up: Kathy M. Brubaker, St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea
 
Nursing in the Community
Winner: Diane Zalecki Bertalan, HAVEN of Oakland County
Runner Up: Mary Ann Ryan, HOPE Recuperative Care Center
 
Post-Acute Care & Specialty Nursing
Winner: Pamela Laszewski, Karmanos Cancer Center
Runner Up: Marla Clausen, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital
 
Staff Nurse (2)
Winner:  Sabrina M. Zott, St. Joseph Mercy Oakland 
Winner:  Deborah White, McLaren Oakland 
Runner-Up:  Maria Borri, Beaumont Health – Royal Oak 
Runner-Up:  Lisa M. Hill, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence 
 
People’s Choice Award
Winner:  Leesa J. Jones, Ascension Michigan – St. John Providence
Runner-Up:  Krystal L. McNamee, Henry Ford Health System – Detroit

Trainee first responders learn to save lives through mobility


This feature is courtesy of Driven, the story of how the Detroit region is leading the world in next-generation mobility.

When first responders are on their way to an emergency, nothing is more important than information, because data learned in advance can save time and lives.

Critical information can tell first reponders if the the road ahead is clear, the size of the building on fire, if people are inside, and what kind of fire suppression system exists in the building.

With smart infrastructure enabling the new world of smart mobility, EMTs could have access to this information, and much more. They’ll also need to be trained to use new tools to gather this potentially life-saving data. That's why a number of companies, including Lear Corp., have helped install an array of new sensor technology into the Combined Regional Emergency Services Training (CREST) mini-city at Oakland Community College.

In addition to Lear’s roadside unit (RSU) sensors, HAAS Alert provided consumer alert applications, Mobile Data Holdings provided real-time video, and TracksUS provided in-vehicle diagnostics.

Running the show is Elaina Farnsworth, thought leader in the autonomous and intelligent transportation industry, and Mobile Comply CEO, says the sensors should be in place by this spring, allowing first responder trainees to test them in a real-world environment. Some of the connections will run through traffic lights, and some radios will be equipped with DSRC (dedicated short-range communication) devices to see if the safety messaging channel can be more effective.

"It really allows us to be very clear and targeted around new technologies that could aid and help these emergency responders in a controlled environment," Farnsworth says.

Mobile Comply was founded in 2010 to provide education and certification work for professionals who wanted to get into connected technology. She says the CREST project is the perfect next step in both educating the next generation of first responders and testing the sensors.

"We started talking about how nice it would be if we could have a conglomerate of different companies that would contribute something to be able to start training our emergency responders how to use some of these connected vehicle technologies," she says. "How can it make their jobs easier? How can it make saving lives faster?

Eventually, she hopes to incorporate drone technology, too, into the array of sensors getting real-time data from the scene of an emergency.

Douglas Smith, executive director for workforce development at Oakland Community College, says Lear has placed the sensors in the buildings and testing will wait until the weather clears up in the springtime. From there, they'll develop training modules for emergency workers.

12-year-old Michigan girl gets candy product into Walmart

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Alina Morse, the 12-year-old founder of Zolli Candy, The After You Eat Treat, announced that she has expanded her 250k Smiles Program to 1 Million Smiles as her line expanded into 4,000 plus Walmart stores. A resident of Wolverine Lake, Michigan, Morse made the announcement on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) live on CNN, Feb. 27.

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Beaumont Health tests Michigan's first 3D whole breast ultrasound for cancer detection

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Beaumont Hospital in Dearborn is one of eight centers nationwide participating in research to improve the detection of breast cancer in women by using SoftVue three-dimensional ultrasound technology on women with dense breast tissue.

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Tech248 member MatchRX revolutionizing surplus prescription drug industry

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Check out this cool Tech248 member company MatchRX a private web-based inter-pharmacy marketplace to buy and sell small quantities of non-controlled, non-expired overstocked prescription drugs and drugs in short supply to satisfy a specific patient need or declared public health emergency.

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5Qs with founder and executive director of Fleece and Thank You

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DBusiness Daily News interviewed Nicholas Kristock, founder and executive director of Fleece and Thank You of Novi, about the nonprofit’s mission to create a more hopeful hospital environment by providing fleece blankets tagged with video messages to children battling an illness. Kristock played semi-professional soccer in Australia while working for four charities and considers the sport the “vehicle” that brought him to the nonprofit world. 

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91 Health + Wellness Articles | Page: | Show All
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